Monthly Archives: August 2014

RESTful Test Endpoints – Test The Unexpected Behavior

RESTful Test Endpoints Representation

We were testing a mobile app which had various APIs, and now our test idea was to test for; “How does our app handle various endpoint responses like 400, 404, 500 and others apart from 200 OK status message?” Example: If you were testing a web application and you see 500 Internal Server Error with some other details and then you report it to the developer, and then the developer reverts to you saying, it is working fine now and he / she is not able to reproduce it. Then, you refresh the 500 Internal Server Error Page, unfortunately or fortunately it works! Now, you keep on trying for many hours to see that message, but you don’t! This was the problem that we were facing and we came up with the idea of developing our own API(s) which could help us to test for endpoint responses while we simulate different types of endpoint responses forcibly in order to see how our app code handles it. Note that, this can be used for Web Application Testing or Mobile App Testing or wherever you want to know how endpoint responses are handled by your app code. We just used Mobile app as an example to help you understand the context.

Where it can be used?

Prototyping : During early stage of your app development where you do not have LIVE API or Server, you could run these kind of tests to get the early feedback of how your app handled such scenarios.

Unit Testing: It can be used by developers who can call our APIs to test various scenarios.

Check Automation: You can call our APIs with different HTTP status codes like 500, 404, 400 etc. to see how your app code handles these things so that you are sure, what will be displayed to your users / customers.

Last, but not least; you can use it wherever you see the need or an idea.

A PICTORIAL REPRESENTATION OF RTE’s WORKING

RESTful Test Endpoints Representation

RESTful Test Endpoints Representation Representation

Visit RET’s page at http://apps.testinsane.com/rte/ for more details.

We Love To Help

If you face any difficulties in using it or if you have any ideas, please feel free to share with us and we can work together in building something and giving back to the community if there is a mutual interest. Write to us at welovetohelp@apps.testinsane.com.

Our first open-source contribution: HTML Comment Extractor (HCE)

HTML Comment Parser by Test Insane Software Testing Services

We always wanted to give to the testing community and that is why we have a separate dedicated team which makes sure we are consistently giving to the community. It is not that it is a good thing to give to the community, but we feel good by doing so and that is sufficient for us. And anything that we get back from the community is always a bonus for us and makes us feel good too. This is just a start and we shall contribute to the testing community whenever our hearts tell us to give. And we would love to say this, “We make sure we dedicate some time in a day to think of such ideas which can add value to our Software Testing community where testers or developers or managers can get benefited in testing their software.”

Why did we develop HTML Comment Extractor / Parser?

Long back, when we were working on a project on Retail Domain, we saw some sensitive details in the comments (HTML and Javascript) on the client side code of a web application. The comment revealed third-party analytics login credentials and one could easily get the analytics data if they land on these kind of comments. So, we thought of building a utility which could extract the comments from the URL we provide and then it runs through the extracted comments for the sensitive information. And sensitive information is defined by dictionary that has the possible keywords which a tester or a developer or test manager or anyone can define based on the context and the context is what they mean by sensitive information or any information that can help them.

This utility is developed using Python. We thank people responsible for developing this beautiful programming language Python. We also thank our team member Sandeep Tuppad who developed HCE for the testing community and Karthik Kini who got the product page for this utility running up (http://apps.testinsane.com/hce).

A quick overview: Here is pictorial representation of how HTML Comment Parser Utility works?

HTML Comment Extractor Pictorial Representation

For complete guide, use our ReadMe.txt file.
You can download the utility along with source code at http://apps.testinsane.com/hce/

We Love To Help

If you face any difficulties in using it or if you have any ideas, please feel free to share with us and we can work together in building something and giving back to the community if there is a mutual interest. Write to us at welovetohelp@apps.testinsane.com.